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Office of Academic Assessment

Information on equity-minded assessment of student learning at Emerson, including resources, programming, and reports.

Why use rubrics?

As the Berkeley Center for Teaching and Learning points out:

Rubrics aren't just for summative evaluation. They can be used as a teaching tool as well. When used by students as part of a formative assessment, they can help students understand both the holistic nature and/or specific analytics of learning expected, the level of learning expected, and then make decisions about their current level of learning to inform revision and improvement (Reddy & Andrade, 2010)."

Rubrics help instructors:

  • Provide students with feedback that is clear, directed and focused on ways to improve learning.
  • Demystify assignment expectations so students can focus on the work instead of guessing "what the teacher wants."
  • Adapt your approach to teaching aspects of a course based on thematic gaps in student learning that are easily identified by reviewing rubrics across a class.
  • Develop consistency in how you evaluate student learning across students and throughout a class.
  • Reduce time spent on grading; Increase time spent on teaching.

Rubrics help students:

  • Focus their efforts on completing assignments in line with clearly set expectations.
  • Self and Peer-reflect on their learning, making informed changes to achieve the desired learning level.

Source: https://teaching.berkeley.edu/resources/improve/evaluate-course-level-learning/rubrics

AAC&U Value Rubrics

Sample rubrics from other institutions

Developing Equitable Rubrics

Anti-Racist Classroom Rubric

This rubric for creating an anti-racist classroom environment was created by Cole M. James for the Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles, CA. 

Link: https://otis.libguides.com/tlc/anti_racist_rubric

A rubric for creating anti-racist classroom environments. Part one focuses on classroom management, reflections, and student interactions, and allows faculty to map their practices to four levels of anti-racist classroom techniques, with 1 being the highest and 4 the lowest.

A rubric for creating anti-racist classroom environments. Part two focuses on collaboration & engagement, lessons, and curriculum design, and allows faculty to map their practices to four levels of anti-racist classroom techniques, with 1 being the highest and 4 the lowest.